Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting
Louisa Sexting

Louisa Sexting



In a small, rural community in central, Virginia, the issue of teen “sexting,” or exchanging nude photographs via social media, made national headlines last year. After the Sheriff’s Office was notified of an Instagram page with nude photos of underage girls from the local high school. They started an investigation and within hours, law enforcement realized how pervasive this problem was. Hundreds of students’ cell phones were confiscated. When a student was caught with illicit material, he or she would give up 10 names of other students who had exchanged illicit images. And those ten students would tell deputies five more names. All of this was breaking local, state and federal laws pertaining to creating, distributing and possessing child pornography for anyone under the age of 18. Their dilemma was that they couldn’t charge every teen with being a predator and sex offender. In most cases, girls were sending naked photos to their boyfriends. When the couple eventually broke up, the photos would find their way to other’s phones. Students didn’t think this was a big deal. Some of the women sexting were even indignant, saying “I don’t see any problem with it. I’m proud of my body.” So while deputies and parents were trying to get teenagers to understand how this could affect their lives and careers, the students shrugged their shoulders and perceived the adults to be overreacting.